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Instructor Honored With Blue Apple Award

When Marvin Lozano walked toward the Main Campus Shipping and Receiving department, little did he know what awaited him in a small box there. He opened one layer of cardboard to find a small box in a certain shade of blue, Tiffany and Co. blue to be exact. Inside that box Lozano found his "Blue Apple Award," a distinguished award given to outstanding educators in the form of a Tiffany crystal apple.

Sep 01, 2016

July 2011

Marvin Lazano
When Marvin Lozano walked toward the Main Campus Shipping and Receiving department, little did he know what awaited him in a small box there. He opened one layer of cardboard to find a small box in a certain shade of blue, Tiffany and Co. blue to be exact. Inside that box Lozano found his "Blue Apple Award," a distinguished award given to outstanding educators in the form of a Tiffany crystal apple.

The Blue Apple Teacher Award is given each year by Study Blue, an online resource for teachers. Nominations can be made for teachers of any education level and only 15 are awarded nationwide. Lozano was the only higher education instructor to receive the award this year.

"Honestly I didn't expect it, I didn't know I'd been nominated," said Lozano. "A student, a colleague or an administrator can recommend you, but it's anonymous. So I don't know who, but they have to write an essay that addresses the contributions that you as a teacher have made to the area of education that you are in, so this would be the community college area."

Lozano is an instructor in the School of Business & Information Technology and teaches many courses, including Introduction to Business, Principles of Management, Business Interpersonal Skills and Entrepreneurship.

Lozano said he was pleasantly surprised when he was notified of having received the award and his Tiffany apple.

"It's always nice to be recognized," Lozano said. "It's something I believe in, and I try to do with our students. It takes the time to write something, with all the daily activities we have and work responsibilities; I just thought it was nice."

According to Study Blue's website, it is "our intention with The Blue Apple Awards is to publicly recognize teachers whose peers (and students) have found them extraordinary. This award is our small way to show appreciation for all of the great work teachers do throughout the year. We look forward to expanding this program in the future."

Having worked in commercial banking, managing portfolios for international companies for a number of years, Lozano began teaching a few courses at Pima College in Arizona and later made the transition to teaching full time in 1998. When he moved to New Mexico, he began working with the Small Business Development Center at CNM and then began teaching business full time.

Lozano says that he has enjoyed watching his students go on to be successful business people after taking his classes. One such student was a nontraditional student and the father of a newborn baby when he took Lozano's course. Lozano said when he ran in to the student years later, he had gone on to become a lawyer and owned his own small firm.

"He said the skills that he learned (in my course) helped him go that direction," Lozano said. "I was really pleased with that. Those are the stories that make you feel that the work's all worth it."

Lozano says that this is his third distinguished award: he was recognized in the mid-1990's as a Small Business Advocate of the Year by the U.S. Small Business Administration; in 2007, he was one of 20 instructors from Hispanic-serving institutions around the country to receive the E. Kika de la Garza Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.